Three Things To Know for BIPOC Mental Health Awareness Month

Judith J. Mercado

BIPOC populations can face significant differences in the accessibility of quality mental health care. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) reported that racial and ethnic minority groups in the U.S. are more likely to be uninsured, more likely to use emergency departments, less likely to have access to mental health services, less likely to use community mental health services, and more likely to receive lower quality care.

July marks BIPOC Mental Health Awareness Month to shine a light on the distinct struggles that underrepresented groups face with mental illness in the United States. BIPOC Mental Health Awareness Month is a chance to destigmatize talking about mental health and substance use disorders. Some feel embarrassed to seek treatment or fear beingĀ shamed by their community. By focusing on these issues in July and all year round, we can help change the inequality and stereotypes stopping marginalized communities from

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